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How to reduce stomach bloating

How to reduce stomach bloating

I see many clients with a wide variety of digestive issues and like them you may also be suffering indigestion, heartburn, constipation, stomach pain, abdominal cramping, diarrhea or the most common issue; irritable bowel syndrome which usually includes all those symptoms and some more besides.

But the one thing that gets mentioned most often is – stomach bloating.

Read on if you would like to discover:

What causes stomach bloating
How to reduce bloating after eating
A simple, natural remedy to get rid of bloating and abdominal gas

Stomach bloating is a big issue for many people. Bloating can occur at any time and it can be uncomfortable or even painful. Admittedly there are many reasons why you may be suffering this particular digestive complaint but there is one thing that you can do to help reduce stomach bloating and I recommend this bloating remedy to virtually every client I see as the first step towards a life without bloating and pain.

It couldn’t be more simple! If you want to reduce bloating after eating …

…. chew, chew and then chew some more!

Yes that’s all there is to it and here’s why. Digestion starts in the mouth. It’s where the food gets physically broken down by your teeth but it’s also where it gets chemically broken down by the enzymes in your saliva; particularly the carbohydrates. When you think about it it makes perfect sense. If you swallowed something whole you wouldn’t be surprised if you got a painful, bloated stomach. You’d expect your digestive system to struggle. Yet the majority of us quite happily swallow whole pieces of food and then wonder why we become bloated after eating.

We eat far too quickly. We chomp, chomp, swallow and the food makes only a passing acquaintance with this vital, first stage of digestion.

If you eat too quickly and you only give passing lip service to chewing you essentially miss out this vital stage. The food hasn’t been broken down adequately either physically or chemically and this can only cause problems further down the line; problems in the form of gas and bloating often accompanied by stomach pains or discomfort.

If you think of your digestive system like a factory; a production line with a specific function taking place at each stage along the line. The raw materials come in at one end, but they’re all packed-up. The raw materials need to be separated out before you could possibly build anything with them. And so the first thing to do is to unpack them. If you didn’t do this you’d hardly expect the factory to run smoothly.

Of course we do all chew our food we just don’t chew it well enough. And it’s usually the carbohydrates that we have difficulty with. Have you ever tried chewing spaghetti? I mean REALLY chewing it. Chewing it till it is indistinguishable in your mouth, broken down by your teeth and ‘dissolved’ by your saliva. It doesn’t happen unless you take time to think about it. And usually we don’t think about chewing because we don’t appreciate the importance of it.

We eat mindlessly

In fact for many of us the time we don’t think about food is when we are eating it!

It’s not just spaghetti that poses a problem. Do you chew mashed potatoes? Or rice? Probably not. We generally swallow those things whole. What about soup or the ever-fashionable smoothie? Physically broken down? Yes. But not chemically broken down. So the carbohydrates are still in their complex form. They haven’t been broken down in to simple sugars which are easily processed further along the digestive tract.

So your digestive system struggles. The ‘food’ begins to ferment in the gut and the result is gas and bloating that you would probably do anything to get rid of. I’m not suggesting you chew soup or your morning smoothie but slowing everything down will certainly help. Keeping food in your mouth long enough for the first stage of digestion to take place can make a huge difference to how you feel later on.

This all sounds very simple. A remedy for bloating that doesn’t involve changing what you eat or taking medication. Chewing. Is that really all there is to it? Well … no. There are other reasons why people experience abdominal bloating and I would always recommend being checked by your GP to rule out anything serious: coeliac disease, issues with the pancreas, gallbladder, liver, ovaries or a serious gastric condition such as Crohn’s disease. Stomach pain and bloating may also be the result of a food allergy or intolerance, but for many people it is simply down to the fact that we eat too quickly.

Taking time to chew food well is something you can do in your own time, to improve your digestion and ultimately improve your health

We live in a society where little time is given to eating. This is unnatural. As a small child you probably ate slowly, chewed everything well and stopped eating when you were satisfied. That’s how it should be. Of course modern life often dictates that our eating gets squashed in to a time frame that doesn’t generally allow for protracted mealtimes and so you have probably been eating too quickly for most of your life.

I know, when my children were small, I was as guilty as anyone of rushing them to eat quickly; waiting impatiently with the next spoonful before they had finished the last. I trained my children to eat quickly – because that’s what I did. Food was often eaten on the run. And when you get in to that habit even when you do take the time too enjoy a meal your chewing is always going to be too fast. Sometimes people do take a long time to eat but they are simply taking time BETWEEN each mouthful rather than taking time OVER each mouthful. There is a difference. Allow the food to be digested in your mouth and you are much less likely to experience a stuffed, bloated stomach after eating.

Do you rush your breakfast; the most important meal of the day? Do you eat lunch at your desk? Do you think about what you’re eating as you eat it or is your mind on other things as you ‘inhale’ your food before dashing out/back to work/to get the dishes cleared? You may answer ‘no’ to those questions in which case you’re heading in the right direction. But do you swallow food that’s still recognisable? If the answer’s ‘yes’ then try slowing down the rate that you chew; being sure that all the food in your mouth is liquid before you swallow it; because that could be all it takes to get rid of bloating for good.

Easier said than done eh? You’ve been eating to quickly for your whole life.

So how do change the habit of a lifetime?

The first step is to develop an awareness of what’s happening when you eat; understanding the process of digestion will help you to eat more mindfully and therefore more slowly. And to practice. It takes three weeks of concentrated effort to develop a new habit but this is one that’s really worth developing particularly if you’re suffering from bloating and pain. Knowing that eating quickly could cause you to experience bloating and gas makes it so much easier to develop the good habit of eating slowly and chewing your food well.

Why not experiment? Go from one extreme to the other; eat something really quickly and see how you feel then eat the same thing the following day really slowly, chewing until it’s liquid in your mouth and see how you feel after that. Bloated? Probably not. If you are bloated then I would recommend looking more closely at what you are eating as you may be intolerant to something such as cow’s milk or wheat. You may be over-eating or you may be eating the wrong combination of foods for your system.

But for most people eating mindfully and chewing food well is all it takes to get rid of bloating.

It’s amazing the difference chewing can make!

What else would help? Taking smaller mouthfuls so that the ratio of food to saliva improves. Chewing. Always putting your cutlery down between mouthfuls. Chewing. Thinking about what you’re eating. Chewing. Stop eating when you are comfortably satisfied. Never eating meals in front of the TV or at your desk. Oh and did I mention? … Chewing!

So why exactly does eating too quickly cause bloating? Well, for a number of reasons. First of all it’s important to understand that when you chew not only are you beginning to digest your food in your mouth so that it’s in the right form when it arrives in the stomach and small intestine but you are also sending a message to your stomach that food is on its way.

In fact this process begins as soon as you anticipate the food in front of you, even before you’ve taken a mouthful. Just thinking about the flavour and smelling the appetising aroma will cause you to salivate. And as you salivate and then begin to taste and chew your food your stomach will respond; preparing to accept the food that it knows is about to arrive.

This process takes time so if you bolt your food your stomach won’t be ready to receive it, your digestion will suffer and you’ll get abdominal bloating. You need to give your body time to create the right environment to digest your food properly; time to release enough stomach acid, digestive enzymes and bile. If food is not broken down properly in the initial stages of digestion (the mouth and the stomach) when it arrives in the small intestine it can cause a lot of problems including gas, bloating and acidity.

Basically the chemistry is all wrong. The particles of food are too large for the small intestine to cope with and so it begins to ferment, or cause inflammation that affects the lining of the gut, or be so unrecognisable that it’s treated as an allergen.

None of this is good news. It can all cause that uncomfortable and painful abdominal bloating and it can all be reduced dramatically by chewing properly. The other factor involved here is that it takes a good twenty minutes for the brain to register that he stomach is full so if you eat too quickly you will probably eat more than your stomach can cope with.

So slow down your eating, pay attention to the sensation of fullness and stop eating when you feel comfortably full rather than stuffed

In this way as you take the pressure off your digestive system you’ll naturally eat the amount that your body needs; probably a lot less than usual. This is a great way to reduce abdominal bloating and a natural and healthy method of weight control too!

You maybe, like I did, think that you do chew properly. Well here’s some guidelines that you may like to follow just to see if it makes a difference. It’s a good idea to practice this on your own so you can really focus on what you’re doing. Once it becomes a habit it’s easier to do it in company. It takes three weeks to develop a habit but once you have, the habit will stay with you!

How to get rid of bloating and chew your way to a flat stomach

Always sit down to eat
Take some time before you begin to really think about the food you are about to eat
Relax and consciously let go of any tension – really important if you’re at work!
Always use cutlery if you can
Take small amounts in each mouthful
Put cutlery or food out of your hands between mouthfuls
Wait until you’ve swallowed before preparing the next spoonful, forkful … or whatever
Chew slowly so that the food gets plenty of time to be affected by the saliva
Chew some more
When you think you’re ready to swallow … chew a bit more
Notice how liquid the food has become compared without how it may have been in the past
Notice how that feels as you swallow
When you feel comfortably full. Stop eating!

Admittedly this is pretty extreme and it might take you twice or even three times as long to eat so you do need to make time for that. But there’s a lot to be gained from making time to eat properly. Good digestion, a life free from bloating, a nice flat stomach ….

Often when we are developing new habits it pays to go from one extreme to the other so that when you relax about it you drift in to a happy balance somewhere in between; never fully returning to the old bad habit. If you practice eating in this way consciously you will find that, in time, it becomes unconscious and natural. And having a flat stomach free from bloating and gas will become natural too!

So there you have it!

It’s simple!

Want to be free from stomach bloating?

All you need to do is CHEW!

by Caroline Tyler

https://plus.google.com/115267677535944839852

As a nutritional therapist and a hypnotherapist I believe that a good diet and a positive attitude have helped me become healthier and happier.

A while ago I created a blog called Vitamin C to pass on some extra tips about natural health and personal development to my clients. It might be of interest to you too.

link : http://justvitaminc.blogspot.co.uk/

How To Rewire Your Brain for Positivity and Happiness

Posted on Thursday, January 31st, 2013 on Buffer

Written by

Kindly visit Walter Chen’s post/link on Buffer for the original post : http://blog.bufferapp.com/how-to-rewire-your-brains-for-positivity-and-happiness

The following post is a guestpost by Walter Chen, founder of a unique new project management tool IDoneThis. More about Walter at the bottom of the post. 

Ever go through a phase where you feel like every day is a Monday? You wake up, you hit snooze. Then you hit snooze again and you just don’t feel it?Yes, I know that negative emotions can eat away at my productivity, creativity, decision-making skills. And yet, I have to admit that sometimes it’s really difficult to reverse the course of a slump.

The unfortunate superpower of the negative is that it has a stronger impact than the positive.

In fact negative impact of setbacks in your work is three times as powerful in affecting motivation than positive progress. It’s just easier to remember the bad stuff that has happened to you during the day than the good.

So why is it, that our brains have a such a negativity bias? The reason is quite simple: They’re actually wired to pay more attention to negative experiences. It’s a self-protective characteristic. We are  scanning for threats from when we used to be hunter and gatherers. But such vigilance for negative information can cause a narrowing, downward spiral and a negative feedback loop that doesn’t reflect reality.

Fortunately, we aren’t doomed by our natural disposition towards negativity.  What’s amazing is that we have the ability to break out of that negative feedback loop and we can actually rewire our brains to think positively. Understanding how the brain can refashion its own connections is the key to unlocking the durable power of positive thinking.

And that’s exactly what this post is all about. Let’s dive in:

The Tetris Effect: What it tells us about how our brains learn new things

Anyone who’s ever played the classic, old-school game of Tetris will know this. Whether on a clunky computer or gameboy or the latest mobile device we all know the game’s surreal ability to spill into real life. After you shut off the game, you still see those Tetris blocks falling in your mind’s eye.

You’re grocery shopping, and you find yourself thinking about rearranging items on grocery shelves and carts in the parking lot. Somehow your mind continues to play the game, even when you’re physically not.

Robert Stickgold, Harvard professor of psychiatry, noticed something similar after a day’s hiking a mountain in Vermont. That night, he dreamt that he was still going through the motions of mountain hiking, clinging to rocks. Curious about this dream replay he tried something: Stickgold got a group of college students of varying skill levels to play Tetris and sleep in the Harvard sleep lab.

Over 60% of the study participants (including, surprisingly, those who suffered from amnesia) reported dreams of images of Tetris pieces falling, rotating, and fitting together. Interestingly, half the Tetris expert participants reported such Tetris dreams while 75% of the novices did. The mind was continuing to work on making sense of the game during sleep.

A more recent study from 2009 it was found that playing Tetris can grow your brain and make it more efficient. Adolescent girls played the game for an average of 1.5 hours a week over three months. The cerebral cortex, or the gray matter, of the girls grew thicker while brain activity in other areas decreased compared to when they’d started. Richard Haier, who had previously found in a 1992 study that there was a “Tetris learning effect” in which the brain consumed less energy as mastery of the game rose, concluded,

“[W]e think the brain is learning which areas not to use. . . . As you learn the game, it becomes more automatic.”

Haier’s 2009 study demonstrated how Tetris affected the brain’s plasticity, or the brain’s ability to change structurally, as the girls practiced and learned how to play the game. Neurons, or nerve cells, in your brain make connections, communicating through synapses. When you learn something, you change those neural connections. Every time you reactivate a circuit, synaptic efficiency increases, and connections become more durable and easier to reactivate. Stickgold’s study and subsequent research that sleep plays a role in this memory process.

So to sum up, whenever you do specific tasks over and over again, they take up less of your brain power over time. And that’s pretty amazing, as this will be the basis for a huge opportunity to change our behavior for the better:

So how can we combat our negativity bias? The Positive Tetris Effect.

Indeed, it’s quite simple: We can harness the brain’s plasticity by training our brain to make positive patterns more automatic. When we practice looking for and being more aware of positive aspects of life, we fight off the brain’s natural tendency to scan for and spot the negatives. Naturally we bring ourselves into better balance.

Shawn Achor frames this rewiring as “The Positive Tetris Effect” in The Happiness Advantage, drawing from the way Tetris impresses our brain so that we end up parsing the world in terms of the game. According to Achor, with the positive Tetris Effect,

“we can retrain the brain to scan for the good things in life—to help us see more possibility, to feel more energy, and to succeed at higher levels.”

Yes, so something as trivial as the game of Tetris can have a scientifically measurable effect on people’s brains and invade their dreams. If that’s the case, the impact of practicing and retaining a more positive thinking pattern, especially on our wellbeing and happiness, can be even more powerful.

We are basically trying to find an undiscovered path that if walked once, makes us happy. The path being the synaptic connections in our brain. And then, because we enjoy it, we go along that path, hundreds and hundreds of times. Slowly a track forms and becomes very clear and easier to walk every time.

Here is an example of a synapse, which represents the path we want to go over and over again, to make it a strong, easy to recognize pattern for our brains:

The best thing about such a practice is its long-term effects. In one study, people who did a “three good things” exercise for a week felt happier and less depressed after one month. The study then did the three-month and six-month follow-ups. Not surprisingly, the happiest participants were the ones who had continued the practice throughout.

What this tells me right of the bat is this: There’s hope for us all! (Even for a curmudgeon like me who reacts to the idea of spending time trying to accentuate the positive with a growl.)

So I think a good way to see the positive Tetris Effect like learning a foreign language. It will be the most difficult and unnatural-feeling at the beginning. And yet, the rewards will make you feel unbelievably happier if you stick with it.

4 Awesome Ways to Change Your Life to Be More Lastingly Positive

Ok, now that we’ve been through the background it’s time to get our hands dirty. How can we put all of this into practice?

At the core, the Tetris Effect is about building a habit that becomes more automatic and therefore longer lasting. In turn, this will sustainably boost your productivity and creativity. As Achor notes,

“Happiness is a work ethic . . . . It’s something that requires our brains to train just like an athlete has to train.”

So with that in mind here are some of the top ways that Achor and others identified to rewire your brain for positivity:

  • Scan for the 3 daily positives. At the end of each day, make a list of three specific good things that happened that day and reflect on what caused them to happen. The good things could be anything — bumping into an old friend, a positive remark from someone at work, a pretty sunset. Celebrating small wins also has a proven effect of powering motivation and igniting joy. As you record your good things daily, the better you will get and feel.
  • Give one shout-out to someone (daily). I love this technique and it is also something the Buffer team is using internally. Take the positive things you’re getting better at recognizing and let people know you’ve noticed! Take a minute to say thanks or recognize someone for their efforts, from friends and family to people at work. A great way to go about this is by sending 1 daily email to someone. It can be your old school teacher, who’s advice you are now appreciating every day. A co-worker or someone you’ve only met. Show courage and say thanks, I love doing this and just checking in with a nice note.
  • Do something nice. Acts of kindness boost happiness levels. Something as small and simple as making someone smile works. Pausing to do something thoughtful has the power to get you out of that negativity loop. Do something nice that is small and concrete like buying someone a coffee. You can try and have that even on your to do list – have you done anything nice for someone today? I love this technique and it’s one of the most amazing ways to feel happier.
  • Mind your mind.  Mindfulness is paying attention to the present moment without judgment. Opening our awareness beyond the narrowness of negativity can help bring back more balance and positivity into the picture.

The regular practice of mindfulness meditation has also been shown to affect the brain’s plasticity, increasing gray matter in the hippocampus, an area of the brain important for learning, memory, and emotion, and reducing gray matter in the amygdala, an area of the brain associated with stress and anxiety. Take a look at these tips on mindfulness and meditation to get started.

Over to you know. Have you discovered some of these techniques to focus on creating more happiness for yourself? I’d love your thoughts on this topic.

About the author: Walter Chen is the co-founder of iDoneThis, a simple way to preserve and celebrate progress at work, every day, that amazing companies like Zappos, Shopify, and reddit use.  He’d love to hear from you on Twitter at @smalter.

The Masterkey to success by Napolean Hill

Posted on

The Master Key To Success

Watch all 13 videos. its life changing they say.

 

The Strangest Secret by Earl Nightingale

Posted on

The Strangest Secret

30 min audio..must listen..

Earl is the one of those persons who has been much ahead of his time.

A wonderful motivational speaker.

Spirit Science

Spirit Science

Watch all videos. They would change the way you think.

Enlightenment

Enlightenment

The intention of posting this link and related documents is not to hurt anyone’s faith or feelings. Kindly exit the site of the contents doesn’t suit you. Thank you

All videos are awesome. You will be guided to other sites and books of extreme knowledge. and Knowledge is wisdom.

Spiritual Awakening

http://www.in5d.com

 

The intention of posting this link and related documents is not to hurt anyone’s faith or feelings. Kindly exit the site of the contents doesn’t suit you. Thank you

All videos are awesome. You will be guided to other sites and books of extreme knowledge. and Knowledge is wisdom.